Wick China Company

For those that registered with our demo site, you have seen the pictures of my collection of Wick China. 

white plate with floral design

Wick China Dinner Plate

I figured that I would prepare a new article with further details and more individual pictures of my collection.  Recently, I acquired my 57th piece of china.  It is always exciting for me to stumble upon another treasure from the Wick China Company.  Even now, I am working on another sugar bowl, though I already have four! 

Just briefly, the Wick China Company was founded by John Wick, who also was the founder of  Wickboro.  The china company was located on was most recently the site of the Bauer Block Company on North Water Street.  He established the china company in 1889 and continued to grow until 1914, when a horrific storm destroyed the plant, along with other industry along the river.  W. G. George of East Palestine, Ohio purchased the business and operated in the facility until around 1935.

Wick China Company Factory

My prize possession is my childrens tea set, which depicts pink and gold cherubs.  I aquired this set from a lady that collected childrens tea sets and wrote childrens story of Victorian times.  Two other unique pieces of china I recently was able to add to my collection were two celery plates with fish art as the theme.  These fish in my opinion appear to be those seen in the Allegheny River and surrounding streams, as opposed to mystical fish or those seen from the ocean.   

white china plates with pictures of fish

Wick China Celery Plates

My goal is to compile a listing of those that worked at the plant, or at least a partial listing, as well as try to learn more about products used in the manufacture of the china.  I also plan to share the known marks that were used by the company during its production.

drawing of factory plan

Wick China Company layout

Shown here from the collection of Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, is a layout of the Wick China company from 1908. 

Material gathered from:

History of Armstrong County Pa, Her People, Past and Present,  J. H. Beers & Co., 1914

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, 1908

pictures from collection of Christopher Anthony

16 thoughts on “Wick China Company

  1. MY SISTER AND I ARE LOOKING TO PURCHASE A PIECE OF WICK. OUR MOTHER’S PEOPLE ARE FROM KITTANNING WE HAVE BEEN WORKING ON A FAMILY TREE FOR ABOUT FIVE YEARS AND ARE PLANNING SECOND TRIP TO KITTANNING TO YOUR ANTIQUING BY THE RIVER SEPT 10 2011 FOR 12 DAY’S FOR MORE RESEARCH IS THE SOMEWHERE WE CAN PURCHASE WICK BEFORE THAN .THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME NANCY

  2. In the time I have been collecting, I have found my Wick China pieces from many places. Antique stores from all over. I have found some at estate sales, and one time did happen to find a piece at the Antiquing by the River. I also have found Wick China on ebay periodically.

    I hope you enjoy your visit to Kittanning and trust you will discover a lot of information.

  3. my g-grandmother was a pottery refinisher (1870-1952). Have you ever seen group pictures of the workers because I have two pictures of her sitting with some people who I would like to identify??

    • Hi Patricia. Thanks for the comment about your great grandmother. Unfortunately, there is little history on the china company. The only pictures that have ever been uncovered are distant photographs of the building. I have a rough layout of the building from fire insurance maps. Currently, I am paging and paging through the 1910 census records in an attempt to gather a composite listing of employees of the company. I’d really love to happen upon some great material from the company or pictures of the employees. Please keep intouch, and I trust you are enjoying our site.

      Christopher Anthony

  4. I have a piece of china from the Wick China Co.. I believe it may have had a lid at one point but I could be wrong. Is there a way I could find out what exactly it is (part of a canister set? Not sure) Thanks for your time.

  5. I just ran a search as I was looking through my storage closet in the kitchen & thought I would run a search on my Wick china piece. I had no idea it was a celery & just like the 2 you acquired except my fish is different. My fish has some wear & the gold around the edge, I noticed a small imperfection about a quarter of an inch (slight separation). This must have occurred during firing as a crack would extend through the piece. Is this considered ironstone? My piece if very thick & heavy compared to most (what I would consider china). I would send you a picture but I am computer illiterate.

    • Good day to you. I am sorry I haven’t answered you sooner. I honestly missed your comment. Wick China is Ironstone china, and the imperfection talk about is from the firing. If you can text, I could provide a cell phone number.

    • Good day to you. Thanks for visiting our site and commenting. As far as value of the wash basin and pitcher that was your great grandmothers, it mostly likely has far more sentimental value than actual monetary value. I’d say in nice shape you might bring $50 to $75 for the two pieces.

      Christopher

  6. I know a lady who has a bathroon set of Wick china. It includes a shaving mug, a soap dish, a bowl and two pitchers, one large and one small. It belonged to her great grandmother. We are trying to find out how much it is worth. Any ideas?

    • Good evening Pat,
      Thanks for visiting our site and taking time to leave us a message. It sounds as though this lady have a nice set of Wick China. It is difficult to put a value on such items. Main stream china companies of the day have a lot of items out there for sale, and with a notable name, like Knowles, Taylor and Knowles or Homer Laughlin, it is easier to price out items. When it comes to Wick China, which is not as a large of name, and the limited number who collect it, pricing items can be difficult. It is only worth what a collector is willing to pay for such items. Is she interested in selling the set, or just curious as to the value? My name is Christopher, and my email is kittanninghistory@gmail.com

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